One of the greatest dangers as a person launches into a disciplemaking ministry is the temptation towards pride, performance, and arrogance. How do we keep our commitment to follow from becoming just one more attempt to perform for God?

If we are to fulfill the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20) and join God in His Kingdom purposes in our time, we must know what we are aiming at. What are the characteristics we would hope to see in someone who identifies themselves as a follower of Jesus?

If you were to have a conversation with some apple trees, you might discover a few vital things we should know at the outset of making disciples.

We can find a hint to the beginnings of disciplemaking if we look to the creation narrative. In whose image were we created, and why?

What would life be like if we truly believed what we read about Jesus in Colossians?

Good news: eternal life starts now. We can expect daily abundance from the hand of the God who dwells in us--wonderful news for right here, today.

Some believers have bought in to a truncated, transactional Gospel—one that promises something in the future, but doesn’t relate all that much to today. But Jesus clearly communicated that His Kingdom good news was magnificent news for daily living. 

Jesus exposes the tendencies we have to choose a certain set of actions by which we justify ourselves before God, while at the same time, our inner lives, our hearts, are still far from God. For example, is it anger, or a little harmless name-calling? Really, what’s the big deal!?

One of my sons-in-law grew up in a town where he observed religious people acting one way on Sunday mornings, but completely different on Friday nights. If we’re honest, we all have blind spots and we often hold others to a different standard than we hold ourselves. The big difference rests in whether we are humbly open to God’s standards.

There’s a noteworthy element of Jesus’ ministry that we can easily forget: His intended audience. Think about it.  The bulls-eye of His gaze and correction was almost wholly focused on the religious people—those who claimed to know the way, but remained far from the Kingdom.