Is it just me, or do toddlers seem to have a built-in independence muscle? How many times have we heard a three year old say, “I do it!!”? The problem is, we don’t grow out of it! We just put a more adult spin on it. It must be a result of the fall of humanity! 

I remember sitting heartbroken in a church service the week after my mom had died suddenly, at the age of 64. I was 41 years old. Pam and I had been attending the church for a year, and had been teaching a Sunday school class for several months. But I realized that not one person in the congregation even knew that my mom had died. 

In the New Testament we read about the way the early church lived—dependent on one another in a way that’s difficult for American Christians to imagine. What holds us back from living this way?

We know that community is a vital idea for us as God’s people. But how do we make the most of it? How do we tell if we’re experiencing the fullness of fellowship the way God designed it?

Watching a favorite holiday movie reminded me of community and the American love of independence. But what does that independence spirit cost us?

One American value that does not help us in our disciplemaking is the idea of rugged individualism. How does God view His human creation and our reliance on one another?

You may have read my last post and said, “Wow, Doug, how in the world can you actually lead and make hard decisions, if you are reflecting Jesus!? In my world…”

I get it, but hear me out.

God’s desire for us to live in relationships whose unity reflects Him is not only for our benefit, but for the benefit of a world that desperately needs to see a different way of life…a way of life that displays abundance and relationships full of genuine love.

Many of us are thinking about New Year’s resolutions this time of year. When I think of a list of relational characteristics we can aspire to, there's one passage that reflects the heart of God as much as any other.

God is One. God exists in three persons. This is the mystery of what theologians have called the Trinity: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. I’d like to point out how this mind-bending theological truth is significant in our conversation on relationships.