Let me whet your appetite for some very practical ideas that Michael frosts writes about in Surprise the World, to help us move towards the people God has placed around us. These are good!
 

Here are some roadblocks to having a positive Kingdom impact...what can we do to avoid them?

Sometimes the “good Christian life” is just plain busy. We find ourselves in a rut, or some would say, a “bubble,” surrounded by other Christians and not quite sure how to deal with those in our lives who haven’t yet decided to follow Jesus. What does it look like to have authentic, fun, and lasting friendships with people who don’t yet have a relationship with God, to the extent that you’d make their top five when times get tough?

Over a period of a couple years, we got to know Chris, a server and bartender at our favorite Mexican food restaurant. Our friendship grew, and we began to have open and vulnerable conversations with him while he served us. One time when we visited the restaurant, Chris sat down, obviously quite disturbed. He went into detail about how he had gotten sloppily drunk the week before, and while at the restaurant had ended up arguing with a coworker. During the argument, he got so upset that he threw plates and glasses, breaking them around the kitchen. He was embarrassed, in trouble, and very vulnerable. 

     I think most of us are willing to disciple someone; we just need some basic steps to follow in helping other people grow. Here are some principles to remember as you start meeting with another person with the goal of helping him or her grow spiritually.

When I was a first-semester freshman in college, some guys showed up to my dorm room and asked me if I was going to go through fraternity rush. I had no idea what they were talking about! I soon found out that it involved parties, girls, and large amounts of alcohol. 

I was once asked to consider taking a new job in the organization I worked for at the time. I decided that getting counsel from some other people would make sense. But a business leader outside our organization was shocked that I would ask others' opinions.

Is it just me, or do toddlers seem to have a built-in independence muscle? How many times have we heard a three year old say, “I do it!!”? The problem is, we don’t grow out of it! We just put a more adult spin on it. It must be a result of the fall of humanity! 

I remember sitting heartbroken in a church service the week after my mom had died suddenly, at the age of 64. I was 41 years old. Pam and I had been attending the church for a year, and had been teaching a Sunday school class for several months. But I realized that not one person in the congregation even knew that my mom had died. 

In the New Testament we read about the way the early church lived—dependent on one another in a way that’s difficult for American Christians to imagine. What holds us back from living this way?