When I fly fish, most often I fish with two or three flies connected together. It’s a helpful technique because it gives the fish three options. If the principles of evangelism that we have been talking about in this series are good for us as individuals, they are exponentially better when we view the sharing of our faith as a “team sport.”

In fly fishing, having the right-sized fly is an important part of “matching the hatch” as described in the last post. Similarly, as we meet people who are on their way to the Kingdom, it is important for us to meet them where they are and bring a right-sized conversation about the gospel.

In the last post we looked at the importance of being set apart and different from our broken world. In this post we want to talk about the value of being the same as those we are attempting to reach. That idea might raise a big question mark for some of us! I’ll use another example from fly fishing to illustrate.

While the beautiful front side of a tapestry reveals the hard work and clarity of a design that would not exist without the diverse and colorful difference of the contrasting threads, the backside of a tapestry reveals to us that God’s people are always a work in progress.

While community is displayed clearly as God’s design in the Scriptures, there is no doubt that life together with others is messy. It’s the work of God to weave us together in unity.

The Christian life was never meant to be lived in isolation. Our American mindset values rugged individualism, but the Scriptures reveal to us something more beautiful. Have you ever considered a beautiful tapestry? All the varied colored yarn that came together to create that design.

Let me whet your appetite for some very practical ideas that Michael frosts writes about in Surprise the World, to help us move towards the people God has placed around us. These are good!
 

Here are some roadblocks to having a positive Kingdom impact...what can we do to avoid them?

Sometimes the “good Christian life” is just plain busy. We find ourselves in a rut, or some would say, a “bubble,” surrounded by other Christians and not quite sure how to deal with those in our lives who haven’t yet decided to follow Jesus. What does it look like to have authentic, fun, and lasting friendships with people who don’t yet have a relationship with God, to the extent that you’d make their top five when times get tough?

Over a period of a couple years, we got to know Chris, a server and bartender at our favorite Mexican food restaurant. Our friendship grew, and we began to have open and vulnerable conversations with him while he served us. One time when we visited the restaurant, Chris sat down, obviously quite disturbed. He went into detail about how he had gotten sloppily drunk the week before, and while at the restaurant had ended up arguing with a coworker. During the argument, he got so upset that he threw plates and glasses, breaking them around the kitchen. He was embarrassed, in trouble, and very vulnerable.