In the Christmas story of Matthew, we see an amazing portrait of seeking . . . and finding. As people living as exiles in this broken world, let’s follow the example of the wise men who travelled across a continent to find a King and worship Him. As you enter the new year, to what lengths are you willing to go in seeking after God?

Is there something going on in your life, or the life of a friend or family member, that just does not make sense? For me, when overwhelmed by the unexpected, I can try to fix things or figure them out. Check out three things we learn from Joseph in the Christmas story.

Paul’s passion was to see the Gospel made known in its fullness. Then, as now, people often missed its full effect. His letter to the Colossians reveals this in wonderful ways. Here and in my next post, I want to discuss two life-giving aspects of the full Gospel Paul expected to see at work in his readers’ lives. 

Is God’s blessing seen in financial affluence? In marriage? In having children? A good job? Think again.

God intends for us to have and display His power each and every day. It’s the good news of the indwelling Christ—“Christ in you, the hope of glory” (Colossians 1:27 NIV). Are you experiencing it?

What would life be like if we truly believed what we read about Jesus in Colossians?

Good news: eternal life starts now. We can expect daily abundance from the hand of the God who dwells in us--wonderful news for right here, today.

Some believers have bought in to a truncated, transactional Gospel—one that promises something in the future, but doesn’t relate all that much to today. But Jesus clearly communicated that His Kingdom good news was magnificent news for daily living. 

“Don’t just sit there... Do something. Say something!!”  How many of you had a parent or older sibling say one of those two statements to you?  The art of waiting and putting our hope in God is counter to our American mentality of “make it happen!”

I’ve come to believe that there is no clearer gauge of where we are putting our hope than the speed of our lives.