In past posts I’ve mentioned Matthew 6 where Jesus speaks strongly about how important it is to “see” and how devastating it is when we don’t see clearly. “The eye is the lamp of the body…” (Matthew 6:22ff). Without a doubt, if our “eyesight” is “poor” and our view of God is distorted, it impacts everything!

Years ago, I sat with an older mentor friend and his wife. He was going through a very scary health issue. They had faith that God would be with them and take care of them, but they were also afraid at the same time. Isn’t this one of the grittiest paradoxes of human experience?

Good or bad? These words are some of the most basic descriptors of quality and morality that we learn about from the time we are children. Though even small children can understand the concepts, they are ideas central to our understanding of God and our standing before Him.

I enjoy action films—where things blow up, kidnappings happen, and heroic rescues win the day! That’s where I learned the phrase “proof of life.” So how does this relate to our current series on living a powerful, full life in Christ?

Galatains 4:4-7 gives one of the most critical identity shifts in the Christian life: "Now you are no longer a slave but God’s own child. And since you are his child, God has made you his heir" (NLT). If we don’t understand how God views us, we will always go back to the Law and rule keeping to motivate us in our obedience. Ugh!


Whether Adam and Eve’s decision to attempt fulfillment through the pursuit of knowledge or our modern temptations toward finding life in work, sex, or material things, the sin nature works against God’s design for us. Jesus’ prayer in John 17:3 succinctly describes true life.

Do you really expect God to do something today? I mean really do something?

Over the past 24 hours, would you say that you were primarily chasing after something (affirmation, a thrill, money, stuff, respect, love) or running from something (fear, failure, relationship, exposure, risk, loneliness)?

In Colossians 1 Paul says:
 
For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross…he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from accusation (Colossians 1:19-22).

In recent posts, we’ve spent some time investigating God’s claims of uniqueness and distinctiveness and how it flies in the face of much modern thinking. When we turn to the New Testament, we find that Jesus Christ, the unique and only Son of God, is declared to have the same sort of supremacy.