On a fishing trip to a high-country lake, I made an interesting observation. When there weren’t waves, we caught NO fish. When the waves picked up, things changed!  The waves bounced through the shallow waters, waking up the submerged bug life—putting them into the water in reach of the fish. The sandy shore spread into the shallows clouding the water just a bit, making it harder for the fish to tell the flies we were offering were fake bugs! The waves change everything – and the fish began to bite.

So—Jesus says, “The eye is the lamp of the body…” (Matthew 6:22ff). He says, “If your eyes are good, your whole body will be full of light. But if your eyes are bad, your whole body will be full of darkness.” What about how we view ourselves? 

The prince of darkness is alive and well. Sometimes, it’s as if a gray cloud sits over our world, creating disillusionment and depression. Yet Jesus uses the illustration of his followers’ goodness being a light on a dark hill.

Michael Frost, in his book, Surprise the World, talks about living “questionable lives.” That is, living in such a way that nonbelievers will ask questions, wanting to know what’s up. Believers through history have exemplified such radical goodness that people took note and ended up following Jesus.

In fly fishing, having the right-sized fly is an important part of “matching the hatch” as described in the last post. Similarly, as we meet people who are on their way to the Kingdom, it is important for us to meet them where they are and bring a right-sized conversation about the gospel.

How we live doesn’t earn us merit with God, but how we live does matter, as a changed life will look different than what our broken world produces. A broken world needs the fragrant aroma of Jesus, which they will only see in our lives.

Most of us are not going to preach to thousands in filled stadiums, and most of us are not persuasive communicators or able to winsomely convince someone of his or her need for Christ in a single sitting. Here are some practical ways the rest of us (the non-preachers and non-evangelists) can bring the good news of Christ into our everyday worlds.

I was a sophomore in college when it happened. My life changed . . .

A number of years ago, I rushed into the house hoping to find things in order for dinner guests, but instead our 2-year-old was “being two,” and dinner wasn’t ready. I didn’t respond very well and was impatient with my embattled spouse.  Afterward, I looked in the mirror and asked, “Lord, does this Christianity really work? Am I really changing?”

A while back, I heard a leader ask his group to share the last time they led someone to Christ. You could feel the tension—some had never had the opportunity to do that. But then the speaker explained his new daily goal: to touch one person’s life every day so that they would be led toward Jesus.