Most people live by an unwritten rule: Do good to those who do good to you or who might treat you well in the future. What Jesus suggests we do instead is crazy! But maybe this is why people who follow Him stand out from the crowd.

In our world of grading on a curve and passing everyone for showing up, Jesus spoke truth, revealing God’s perspective.  Look at your own life. What kind of fruit do you produce?

God has made every one of His followers a masterpiece with an attention-getting purpose. It feels good to think of, doesn’t it?!

The prince of darkness is alive and well. Sometimes, it’s as if a gray cloud sits over our world, creating disillusionment and depression. Yet Jesus uses the illustration of his followers’ goodness being a light on a dark hill.

Michael Frost, in his book, Surprise the World, talks about living “questionable lives.” That is, living in such a way that nonbelievers will ask questions, wanting to know what’s up. Believers through history have exemplified such radical goodness that people took note and ended up following Jesus.

Good or bad? These words are some of the most basic descriptors of quality and morality that we learn about from the time we are children. Though even small children can understand the concepts, they are ideas central to our understanding of God and our standing before Him.

I have been using the analogy of a fisherman’s fly to illustrate concepts related to sharing our faith. Here’s another one. When a fly is tied, it includes a hook, flash, materials that look true to life, and appropriate weight, all presented according to the context. It’s the complete package.

Fishing experts say that 90 percent of the fish are in 10 percent of the water. This same idea is helpful when we think about our efforts to share the gospel. We need to be hangin’ out where the “fish” are. In The Navigators we want to raise up people who are living and discipling among the those yet to know Christ.

When I fly fish, most often I fish with two or three flies connected together. It’s a helpful technique because it gives the fish three options. If the principles of evangelism that we have been talking about in this series are good for us as individuals, they are exponentially better when we view the sharing of our faith as a “team sport.”

In fly fishing, having the right-sized fly is an important part of “matching the hatch” as described in the last post. Similarly, as we meet people who are on their way to the Kingdom, it is important for us to meet them where they are and bring a right-sized conversation about the gospel.